Ordinary People and American History

A 5 page paper which examines how ordinary people often help create powerful times in American history. George Robert Twelves Hewes, Christopher Columbus and John Smith are discussed. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

American Slavery/American Freedom - An Analysis

A 6 page analysis of Edmund S. Morgan's book American Slavery/American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia. In this book Morgan examines the economic and demographic development of early Virginia. The fact that a love for liberty and equality in the American colonies developed simultaneously with a reliance on the institution of slavery is the central dichotomy in the study of early American history. Morgan examines this relation and postulates that the experience of Virginia is indicative and applicable to the rest of the colonies regarding the issue of slavery. No additional sources cited.

AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARIES AND VIRGINIA’S WAY OF LIFE

This 7-page paper examines Sydnor's American Revolutionaries in the Making: Political Practices in Washington’s Virginia, examines the theories behind democracy and aristoracy, and discusses if Virginia's political systems from the 18th and 19th centuries would work in today's political system.

Origins of Slavery in the U.S. Colonies

(7 pp). Although, the number of African American slaves grew slowly at first, by the 1680s they were essential to the economy of Virginia. During the 17th and 18th centuries, African American slaves lived in all of England's North American colonies. Before Great Britain prohibited its subjects from participating in the slave trade, between 600,000 and 650,000 Africans had been forcibly transported to North America . Bibliography lists 6 sources.

Origins of Slavery in the U.S. Colonies.

(7 pp). Although, the number of African American slaves grew slowly at first, by the 1680s they were essential to the economy of Virginia. During the 17th and 18th centuries, African American slaves lived in all of England's North American colonies. Before Great Britain prohibited its subjects from participating in the slave trade, between 600,000 and 650,000 Africans had been forcibly transported to North America . Bibliography lists 9 sources.

Thomas Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia

In 9 pages, the author discusses Thomas Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia. Notes on the State of Virginia is an extensive work undertook by Thomas Jefferson. In this tome, Jefferson discussed his state of Virginia proudly and in great detail. The book was written in the twenty-three chapters or responses to queries from a Frenchman concerning the state of Virginia. From his writing, it is clear that Thomas Jefferson was first and foremost a Virginian. His words were a factual display of what the state, its people, and its landscape meant to him. No additional sources are cited.

Radical Ideas in Early America

This 8 page paper provides an overview of the ideas to come from the American Revolution as well as ideas which preceded it, such as those which sprang from the Enlightenment. Also discussed is the period shortly after the revolution and more briefly, contemporary American society. The radical nature of the early American ideas is explored. Theorists such as Thomas Paine and John Locke are emphasized. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

Slavery in Eighteenth Century Virginia

This 7 page paper takes a look at the slave trade in Virginia during the 1700s. Attention is paid to the geography of Virginia and its ambivalence due to its proximity between North and South. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

The Evolution of American Literature from the Colonial Period to the Romantic Period

This 5 page paper traces the development of American literature from the religious and puritan themes of colonial sermons to the political writings of the revolutionary years and into the mature use of fiction to reflect reality rather then recreate it in the romantic period. Authors discussed in the paper include John Winthrop, Jonathan Edwards Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Edgar Allen Poe and Emily Dickinson. The bibliography cites 8 sources.

The Individual and the State

This 5 page paper explores the concept of preference to individual desires and needs as opposed to the state's through the eyes of Adam Smith and Karl Marx. The Enlightenment, American Revolution and French Revolution are seen as influential in terms of a shift in thought about individuality. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

James Meredith

This 5 page report discusses the young man who in 1962 found himself as the focal point of the civil rights movement when he became the first African American to enroll at the University of Mississippi, 'Ole Miss.' Four years later, he was gunned down while leading the 'March Against Fear,' an effort to encourage African Americans to vote. He has remained active in civil rights but his conservative views have alienated many. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Intercultural Relationships in 'The Unredeemed Captive' by John Demos

This 10 page paper considers this factually based book which examines the relationship between the English, the French and the Native Americans in the early eighteenth century. This is undertaken through the story of the Williams family, following the story of Eunice Williams who chooses not to return when her family are released. The paper considers the relationship between the Native Americans and the French in their fragile alliance and the Puritan behaviour of John Williams concerning his daughter. The bibliography cites 1 source.

The US Constitution and Political Factions

This 5 page paper examines the views of James Madison, John Adams and the founding fathers on the importance of Constitutional protection against political factions. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

“From Here to Eternity”: Army as a Society

A 5 page paper which discusses how James Jones’ “From Here to Eternity” is a story that details how the army is a society in and of itself. The paper focuses on the characters of Captain Holmes and Prew. No additional sources cited.

A Different View of US History

A 5 page summary and analyzes of a history text by Dinnerstein, Nichols, and Reimers, Natives and Strangers (1979) which is probably one of the first efforts at inclusion and acknowledgment of diversity in regards to US history. The writer argues that to a large degree, the authors achieved their goal, as this text offers a survey of American history that stresses the contributions of minorities and also the perspective of minorities toward the events that led to the founding of the United States. No additional sources cited.