John Gaddis: Rethinking the Cold War

5 pages. Yale Professor John Lewis Gaddis, in his book, "We Now Know: Rethinking the Cold War History", tells us that the Cold War was inescapable. Depending upon one's interpretation, Gaddis ascertains that the Cold War possessed many instigators from American paranoia to a lack of mutual cooperation to the outright compromise of foreign policy. This paper discusses the primary causes of the Cold War and the reasons it evolved. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

The Cold War: Causes and Ongoing Tensions

A 5 page overview of the Cold War. This paper discusses the causes of the Cold War, the tensions that existed during this time, and incidents such as the Cuban Missile Crisis that almost resulted in full-out war. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Analysis of Elaine Tyler May's "Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era"

A 6 page paper which analyzes Elaine Tyler May's 1988 book "Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era," which asserts that after World War II, Americans preferred marrying young, perpetuating traditional gender roles and a secure home life, because of the unsettling experiences of the Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War. Specifically assessed are the relative causal influences of these historical events to determine which factor was the most responsible for the desire of Cold War America to achieve security through marriage, tradition and home. No additional sources are used.

The Cold War: A Comparison of the “The Hunt for Red October”, “Red Storm Rising”, and Historical Fact

A 5 page review of the Cold War years. The author of this paper emphasizes that the intent of the Cold War was to stabilize world politics and to maintain peace. In reality, it could be contended that the real outcome of this political approach was anything but a peaceful and secure world order. Indeed, the Cold War itself was a kind of warfare. Even in recognition of the fact that no actual warfare between the two main players, the Soviet Union and the United States erupted during the Cold War years, it was a period of intense hostility. This hostility is no better imprinted on the American psyche than through literature and movies. Two books in particular have added to our understanding of the Cold War. These books, both by author Tom Clancy, are “The Hunt for Red October” and “Red Storm Rising”. Each offers significant insight to the tensions which existed between the Soviet Union and the United States during the Cold War years. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

The Cold War: Causes, Treaties, and Ongoing Tensions

This 6 page paper traces the root causes of the Cold War all the way back to the Russian Civil War and discusses how the tensions between the US and Russia magnified during the middle war years and World War II. Incidents such as the Cuban Missile Crisis almost resulted in full-out war. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Cold War Civil Rights

A 3 page review of Mary Dudziak’s Cold War Civil Rights. No additional sources cited.

Chapter Summaries: The Cold War and the Greater West Asian Crisis

This 4 page paper summarizes two textbook chapters: the cold war and the greater Asian crisis.

The Cold War: A Time of Instability

An 8 page discussion of the Cold War. Contends that this period was anything one of peace and security. Provides examples of the friction which existed between the United States and the Soviet Union, the events culminating in the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the dissolution of the Soviet Union, and the changing role of the U.S. in maintaining world peace, as well as other examples illustrating that indeed this was a vary unstable period. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Cold War Questions

A 5 page research paper that examines 4 questions pertaining to the Cold War. The questions cover issues that produced the war; where "hot" wars broke out and areas of the world in which the US and the USSR competed for loyalty; key events that affected the relations between the superpowers; and reforms instituted by Gorbachev and other causes of the end of the Cold War. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

The Cold War and its Failure to Escalate to a Hot War

It has been argued that one of the most important aspects of examining the Cold War, is not to examine why and how it escalated, but to examine why did not escalate into a "hot war". This 8 page paper looks at the Cold War and how it progressed; applying a conflict escalation model to identify the way the conflict escalated, and discusses why it did not end in outright war. The bibliography cites 9 sources.

The Early Days of the Cold War

A 5 page paper discussing the beginnings of the Cold War. NATO is discussed as well as the necessity for such an organization. A brief respite from the tension is described. Kennedy and Khrushchev were perhaps the greatest players in the Cold War and their involvement is discussed. The Cuban missile crisis was the closest either country came to actually making nuclear war a reality. Bibliography contains 4 sources.

The Cold War / Self-Fulfilling Prophecy

A 10 page piece that discusses the self-fulfilling prophecy of the Cold War, in that the buildup of arms against the perceived threat to borders and national economic stability, created an atmosphere of fear and annihilation. Or did it? The governments eventually moved onto the ground that there were ways to win a nuclear war. Only public outcry, and leaders such as Michel Gorbachev changed the face of the cold war. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

The Rise And Fall Of The Cold War

5 pages in length. When one contemplates the rise and fall of the Cold War, there exist a number of variables that must be addressed in order to gain a comprehensive understanding. Depending upon one's interpretation, the Cold War possessed many instigators from American paranoia to a lack of mutual cooperation to the outright compromise of foreign policy. However, history has reflected myriad extraordinarily telling accounts of what actually did begin the rise, as well as the ultimate fall, of the Cold War; one only need decide which interpretation to believe. The writer discusses the rise and fall of the Cold War. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Cold War Consequences

The Cold War was a war of ideology that had it's beginnings in the aftermath of World War II and the redistribution of power. The two great powers, the United States and the Soviet Union struggled for a balance of power in a world where even the definitions of peace had changed. The Cold war had the effect of generating an active defense of American capitalism. Private enterprise economy was seen as a viable and stable economic system. Economic freedom and political democracy were commingled in the eyes of the world, much as communism and authoritarian government were. This 5 page paper examines some of the changes wrought by the ending of the Cold War and the changes that might be expected in the future. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

CIA Intelligence Operations

A 7 page paper discussing the Central Intelligence Agency as it relates to the experiences associated with the arms race with the Soviet Union, Cold War in Europe and Cold War in developing nations. The role of each of the "three communities" of the CIA - covert operations, intelligence gathering and data analysis - is discussed in each section. Bibliography lists 5 sources in 11 footnotes.