John L. Gaddis/US and the End of the Cold War

A 3 page book review The United States and the End of the Cold War by historian John L. Gaddis. This text presents a thorough and insightful look backwards at the four decade long struggle known as the Cold War, focusing particularly on why it ended and what lessons the world as a whole could draw from this experience. No additional sources cited.

Cold War Questions

A 5 page research paper that examines 4 questions pertaining to the Cold War. The questions cover issues that produced the war; where "hot" wars broke out and areas of the world in which the US and the USSR competed for loyalty; key events that affected the relations between the superpowers; and reforms instituted by Gorbachev and other causes of the end of the Cold War. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

The Cold War and its Failure to Escalate to a Hot War

It has been argued that one of the most important aspects of examining the Cold War, is not to examine why and how it escalated, but to examine why did not escalate into a "hot war". This 8 page paper looks at the Cold War and how it progressed; applying a conflict escalation model to identify the way the conflict escalated, and discusses why it did not end in outright war. The bibliography cites 9 sources.

John Gaddis: Rethinking the Cold War

5 pages. Yale Professor John Lewis Gaddis, in his book, "We Now Know: Rethinking the Cold War History", tells us that the Cold War was inescapable. Depending upon one's interpretation, Gaddis ascertains that the Cold War possessed many instigators from American paranoia to a lack of mutual cooperation to the outright compromise of foreign policy. This paper discusses the primary causes of the Cold War and the reasons it evolved. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Cold War Ideolgies and Their Importance

When WWII ended America was filled with loyal and idealogical citizens. That ideology sustained us throughout the cold war and now that it is over stands at the ready in case it is needed again. This five page paper outlines and discusses the ideals and beliefs that were held by Americans just prior to the cold wars inception. Bibliography lists four sources.

Analysis of Elaine Tyler May's "Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era"

A 6 page paper which analyzes Elaine Tyler May's 1988 book "Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era," which asserts that after World War II, Americans preferred marrying young, perpetuating traditional gender roles and a secure home life, because of the unsettling experiences of the Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War. Specifically assessed are the relative causal influences of these historical events to determine which factor was the most responsible for the desire of Cold War America to achieve security through marriage, tradition and home. No additional sources are used.

The Cold War: A Comparison of the “The Hunt for Red October”, “Red Storm Rising”, and Historical Fact

A 5 page review of the Cold War years. The author of this paper emphasizes that the intent of the Cold War was to stabilize world politics and to maintain peace. In reality, it could be contended that the real outcome of this political approach was anything but a peaceful and secure world order. Indeed, the Cold War itself was a kind of warfare. Even in recognition of the fact that no actual warfare between the two main players, the Soviet Union and the United States erupted during the Cold War years, it was a period of intense hostility. This hostility is no better imprinted on the American psyche than through literature and movies. Two books in particular have added to our understanding of the Cold War. These books, both by author Tom Clancy, are “The Hunt for Red October” and “Red Storm Rising”. Each offers significant insight to the tensions which existed between the Soviet Union and the United States during the Cold War years. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Cold War Consequences

The Cold War was a war of ideology that had it's beginnings in the aftermath of World War II and the redistribution of power. The two great powers, the United States and the Soviet Union struggled for a balance of power in a world where even the definitions of peace had changed. The Cold war had the effect of generating an active defense of American capitalism. Private enterprise economy was seen as a viable and stable economic system. Economic freedom and political democracy were commingled in the eyes of the world, much as communism and authoritarian government were. This 5 page paper examines some of the changes wrought by the ending of the Cold War and the changes that might be expected in the future. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

The Cold War: Causes, Treaties, and Ongoing Tensions

This 6 page paper traces the root causes of the Cold War all the way back to the Russian Civil War and discusses how the tensions between the US and Russia magnified during the middle war years and World War II. Incidents such as the Cuban Missile Crisis almost resulted in full-out war. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

'The End of Victory Culture' by Tom Engelhardt

A 5 page paper in which the writer provides an overview of his concepts in The End of Victory Culture, especially as they relate to the transition in perceptions of the American war story in post-World War II Cold War America. No additional sources cited.

Wasteful Spending In The Military / A Problem Spanning Decades

An 8 page paper that provides an overview of the issue of wastefulness in governmental spending as it relates to the United States over the past two decades. The writer focus on budgetary and economic issues that have translated into wasteful spending in light of the end of the Cold War. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Transnational Crime, Terrorism and Liberalism

This 3 page paper looks at the increase in transnational organized crime and terrorism since the end of the cold war, looking at ho and why it has increased. The patterns and influences are all discussed along with the impact of liberalism. The bibliography cites 6 sources.

Soviet Union in the 1980s

A 5 page research paper that examines the end of the Cold War, focusing on the arms race and the Soviet Union. After World War II, the world faced another crisis, in the form of expansion by the Soviet Union of its sphere of influence. While historians and scholars differ concerning the causes of the arms race known as the Cold War, many agree with John Lewis Gaddis (1997) that the US had no alternative but to suppress Soviet expansion at all costs. This examination looks at Russia in the 1980s, while focusing on the arms race and the culmination of the Cold War. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

The Most Historically Significant Events of the Twentieth Century

A 7 page discussion of several of the most significant events of the twentieth century. Emphasizes that the twentieth century has quite possibly witnessed more changes in world politics than any other time in history. Provides a brief outline of four of these changes: the Berlin Airlift, the end of the Cold War, the end of the Soviet Union and the formation of the United Nations. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Chapter Summaries: The Cold War and the Greater West Asian Crisis

This 4 page paper summarizes two textbook chapters: the cold war and the greater Asian crisis.