19th Century Jews, Catholics, and Anti-Semitism

This 7 page report discusses the existence of anti-Semitism in the 19th century and the differing ways in which Catholicism and Judaism dealt with it. From the vantage point of the opening days of the 21st century, the issue of anti-Semitism and the ways in which Jewish people were viewed by most Christian faiths in the 19th century appears relatively similar. Jews were reviled throughout Christianity for what “good Christians” defined as a host of sins, certainly not the least of which was that they were “the murderers of Christ.” Bibliography lists 7 sources.

The Impact of the Renaissance Period on Physical Education:

This 5 page paper discusses the impact of the Renaissance period on physical education. Specifically, major renaissance happenings such as the black plague, the Spanish Inquisition, and the crusades are discussed in terms of their effect on physical education. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Comparison of Two Writings on the Seven Years’ War by Canadian Historians

This is an 8 page paper comparing two different articles by Canadian historians on the Seven Years’ War. Two articles by Canadian historians Peter MacLeod (The University of Ottawa) and Ian Steele (The University of Western Ontario) give two different perspectives on the Seven Years’ War in United States and Canada between the years 1756-1763. MacLeod gives an in depth narrative of the influence of the Catholic Church on the Canadian Iroquois and the Amerindians along the St. Lawrence River near Montreal. Although many people are aware that a strong alliance existed between the Iroquois and the French, MacLeod explains how deeply this connection is related to their ties through Catholicism. Steele’s article is an examination along with four other critics to the recently released Fred Anderson book on the Seven Years’ War. Although the critics admit that the book has made available information about the Seven Years’ War to a larger audience than was available before, they were “shocked” to discover that Anderson only used English sources for his narrative. After reading MacLeod’s history on the Iroquois in New France, it is easy to see how Steele is justified in condemning Anderson in his obvious exclusion of more personal and French accounts of the Seven Years’ War. In combination, both sources give the reader an idea what range of material is available on the Seven Year’s War and in many ways complement each other when taken together. Bibliography lists 3 sources.